Ganesh Khade What do you recommend, Vim, Sublime Text or VS Code for a newbie? I used to recommed VS Code, but everyone I recommend complained about, how slow it was than Sublime Text.
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Santeri Tarvainen If JetBrains has IDE for your language, try it - I used VS Code for years before trying PyCharm and I feel like I missed my years. So much better, so much faster that it blew my mind
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Esc VIM. Time invested well.
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Matthew Druid You might want to specialize e.g., WebStorm if you're primarily doing frontend stuff. Worth it for the extra functionality. I use multiple IDEs (and Vim) depending on what work I'm doing. Vim is great because it exists everywhere and makes quick work of short editing tasks -- stuff you're likely to do on a new system.
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Daedalus vs code. Felt nothing slow. Extensions are so good.
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๐Ÿ’ฃ Zoid I highly recommend VS Code, vim, and gedit for beginners. I love Sublime, but it's definitely not worth the price if this isn't something you're going to be doing long term.
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Stoyan Zhekov Depends on what is your goal. Vim is great if you are going to work on servers (system administration) - pretty much every UNIX derivate have a version on vi by default. For programming - VS Code - modern IDE, good support, frequent updates. Sublime is an editor, while VS code is an IDE, so comparison is not very fare. Atom... better stay away - wrapper around Chrome, making it looks like an editor...
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Daedalus Most would say VScode is an editor that is approaching IDE level features. But still an editor nonetheless. Do you mean Visual Studio?
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๐ŸŒŠ Zero Two vim for speed, vscode for functionality
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๐ŸŒš Cosmo If you prefer a graphical editor, Onivim is worth checking out.
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๐Ÿ—œ๏ธ Mx If you want to *really* learn to code, pick a simple text editor. The only way to learn is to write your code yourself, not using the automated help of an IDE. IDEs are also slow and clumsy. If your code editor requires you to use the mouse, you're off to a bad start as a professional programmer.
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Daedalus sounds a lot like gate keeping.
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๐Ÿคจ Zero Error Vs code was build by electron js, so it's just nothing but your chrome browser tab, with extra features, sometimes it lags on low power RAM system. By adding more extension and watching files changes, quite RAM aggressive, sublime otherwise it's written in C, with less fancy features, suitable for basic, answer for your question fully depend on your working environment, if you are normal web dev sublime is reasonable choice
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Abhinav Gupta Vs code is great, once you get used to that debugger, it would be hard to use anything else. I have started using sublime though, because I purchased a license recently. So I've decided to use it no matter what, to get my money's worth
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๐Ÿ—จ๏ธ Fui I've been using Code (The Open Source build of Visual Studio Code editor), and I'm quite pleased with it. But I have a fairly recent and decent computer, which means that maybe I'm blindsighted to some of VSCode's resource hungry limitations...
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๐Ÿ˜ธ Iaroslav Sublime for general development, vim for times when you need to fix things on live production servers .
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Ganesh Khade It might feel I am advertising Micro, but have you tried it, I recommed it to newbies.
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๐Ÿ‘๏ธ Mbladra Vim is a disease. Once you learn it well enough, it's all you can use
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Ganesh Khade I know, I have been battling with it for so long.
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โ˜๏ธ Jean-David Moisan I see that as an absolute win.
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David Satime-Wallin Everyone should learn Vi(m) but it's not suitable for most to use it as their main IDE. Vi(m) is available on pretty much any system so it's great to know the basics for doing changes on servers etc. I use it as my main IDE in my profession but most people tend to stick to VSCode for example.
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๐Ÿค” David Agreed that not everyone should use it as their IDE. IMO it's absolutely necessary for working on servers or in a terminal, and far preferable to Nano.
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๐ŸŒš Cosmo I had a hard time getting into Vim, but once I got it, I couldn't live without it. Now it's my main IDE for everything.
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Ice I think it's definitely worth learning vim just for the key bindings. It speeds up your workflow so much once you're past the learning curve, and most editors (e.g. Sublime, VSCode, Jetbrains) support vim bindings out-of-the-box or with an official plugin.
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๐Ÿ˜ Yt L. VS Code is great. Learning curve for vim is probably too steep unless you have a compelling reason to use it - e.g. you are SSH'ing into a lot of servers and needing to edit files.
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Ganesh Khade for SSH'ing, I recommend, Micro editor, it's a great one. You should try.
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๐Ÿงฉ Ben my company made us migrate from atom to vscode. it was a pain at first but vscode is so well thought-out and has microsoft's resources behind it. everything "just works" and it's great. i haven't had any speed issues
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๐Ÿ˜ƒ Kit `VS Code` to run a project. `Vim` plugin in `VS Code` to edit text.
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๐Ÿจ James S. I still like VS Code, to be honest, though I haven't used ST for a while so perhaps I don't remember/know how much faster ST is?
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๐Ÿค˜ Jasko vs code hands down, and atom otherwise. if you're new, you don't need to be dropping $$ for a text editor imo. VIM after that.
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Ganesh Khade I found out, VS Code runs better on Mac OS somehow but not so on other systems, Elementary OS. Also, developers in developing countries tend to have, less powerful systems.
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